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In Harm’s Way: Smart Regulation of Digital & Network Technologies - Agenda

Monday, August 12, 2019

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.            Session I. The Future of Information and Communications Technology
The conference begins with a presentation by Reed Hundt, Chief Executive Officer, Coalition for Green Capital on the future of communications, computing and information technology. This session will explore how the next generation of communications (5G), artificial intelligence and distributed computing will converge. This presentation will spark this outstanding question for the remainder of the conference: Given the direction of technological advancement, new business models and harms to be avoided, what is the appropriate measure and level of governmental action in this field?

9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.            Session II. Future Benefits and Harms: IoT+AI+5G
In this opening session, Nicol Turner-Lee, Fellow, Brookings Institution, will deliver a presentation on how the tech industry and government ought to approach new strategies to assure that new technologies mitigate harms for society. Participants will examine benefits and harms to consumers caused by the use of digital and network technologies. The combination of speed and reach of new technologies – such as the Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence and 5G – are changing the ways in which businesses operate and serve consumers. The result of this new ecosystem of technologies has also increased a range of negative consequences faced by consumers. What potential harms and benefits will exist in the future? What new goals need to be developed by the tech industry and government to assure that emerging technologies are used to benefit the populace and not harm society?

10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.            Session III. Regulatory Models and Jurisdiction
Regulators in some nations have adopted comprehensive privacy regulations. Similarly, states such as California have followed suit by creating laws that impact companies both inside and outside of California while protecting their citizens’ rights. The development and enforcement of these regulatory models have already proven to be complicated and unclear. In this session, participants will examine varying regulatory models and standards for online protection, including addressing issues of access and choice. What approach should be taken at the international, national and state level to protect consumers? How do regulators encourage and preserve competition that effectively balances consumer protection, safeguards and innovation? In what ways can public and private entities work together to enforce standards? Richard Whitt, President, GLIA Foundation, will provide a brief presentation on how government ought to approach new approaches to regulation.

2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.               Session IV. Working Groups
Working Groups will meet to address issues and policy solutions at the federal, state and local levels in their topic area.

Working Group A: User Protections (meet in the Paepcke Library)

  • Includes privacy, bias, surveillance and the protection of civil rights

Working Group B: Consumer Choice, Innovation and Competition (meet in the Paepcke Gallery)

  • Includes international markets, mergers, innovation and anti-trust laws

Working Group C: Closing the Digital Divide (meet in the Lauder Seminar Room)

  • Includes federal, state, and local collaborations to promote broadband deployment in rural and other unserved areas

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.            Session V. Presentation and Discussion of Initial Working Group Reports
In this plenary session, working group leaders will report their proposed policies to the larger group.

10:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.             Session VI. Working Groups Continued

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

8:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.            Session VII. Refinement of Working Group Reports and Recommendations

Monday, August 12, 2019

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.            Session I. The Future of Information and Communications Technology
The conference begins with a presentation by Reed Hundt, Chief Executive Officer, Coalition for Green Capital on the future of communications, computing and information technology. This session will explore how the next generation of communications (5G), artificial intelligence and distributed computing will converge. This presentation will spark this outstanding question for the remainder of the conference: Given the direction of technological advancement, new business models and harms to be avoided, what is the appropriate measure and level of governmental action in this field?

9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.            Session II. Future Benefits and Harms: IoT+AI+5G
In this opening session, Nicol Turner-Lee, Fellow, Brookings Institution, will deliver a presentation on how the tech industry and government ought to approach new strategies to assure that new technologies mitigate harms for society. Participants will examine benefits and harms to consumers caused by the use of digital and network technologies. The combination of speed and reach of new technologies – such as the Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence and 5G – are changing the ways in which businesses operate and serve consumers. The result of this new ecosystem of technologies has also increased a range of negative consequences faced by consumers. What potential harms and benefits will exist in the future? What new goals need to be developed by the tech industry and government to assure that emerging technologies are used to benefit the populace and not harm society?

10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.            Session III. Regulatory Models and Jurisdiction
Regulators in some nations have adopted comprehensive privacy regulations. Similarly, states such as California have followed suit by creating laws that impact companies both inside and outside of California while protecting their citizens’ rights. The development and enforcement of these regulatory models have already proven to be complicated and unclear. In this session, participants will examine varying regulatory models and standards for online protection, including addressing issues of access and choice. What approach should be taken at the international, national and state level to protect consumers? How do regulators encourage and preserve competition that effectively balances consumer protection, safeguards and innovation? In what ways can public and private entities work together to enforce standards? Richard Whitt, President, GLIA Foundation, will provide a brief presentation on how government ought to approach new approaches to regulation.

2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.               Session IV. Working Groups
Working Groups will meet to address issues and policy solutions at the federal, state and local levels in their topic area.

Working Group A: User Protections (meet in the Paepcke Library)

  • Includes privacy, bias, surveillance and the protection of civil rights

Working Group B: Consumer Choice, Innovation and Competition (meet in the Paepcke Gallery)

  • Includes international markets, mergers, innovation and anti-trust laws

Working Group C: Closing the Digital Divide (meet in the Lauder Seminar Room)

  • Includes federal, state, and local collaborations to promote broadband deployment in rural and other unserved areas

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.            Session V. Presentation and Discussion of Initial Working Group Reports
In this plenary session, working group leaders will report their proposed policies to the larger group.

10:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.             Session VI. Working Groups Continued

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

8:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.            Session VII. Refinement of Working Group Reports and Recommendations
In this final plenary session participants will work to refine suggestions into a set of simple, achievable actions. Participants will critique, improve upon, and, if appropriate, unify Working Group reports. The outcomes will provide the foundation for the final written report of the Conference.